Gutlove, Paula (June 2000). “Health as a Bridge to Peace: The Role of Health Professionals in Conflict Management and Community Reconciliation.” Violence and Health: Proceedings of the WHO Global Symposium, 12-15 October 1999 Kobe, Japan: Kobe World Health Organization. Reprinted with Permission (12 pages).

Involvement of professionals from different sides of a conflict in the delivery of health care can be a model for collaborative action, and can create the long-term community involvement that is essential for sustainable peace. This paper looks at the Health Bridges for Peace project (HBP), an initiative launched by the Institute for Resource and Security Studies (IRSS) in 1996 to help health care professionals realize their potential to heal violence-ravaged individuals and communities. The project utilizes a shared concern, namely the restoration of public health, as a vehicle to convene, engage, and train health care professionals in conflict management and community reconciliation techniques. IRSS initiated the first HBP field program in the former Yugoslavia in 1997 and the second HBP field program in the North Caucasus in November 1998. Both field programs have enjoyed the support of WHO and other international agencies.

HBP has provided new hope and possibilities to many indigenous health professionals, providing them with new opportunities, a new vision, and a new role in their community and in the world. By working and training together, health professionals are giving their communities a symbol of hope and a reason to believe that the promise of their shared future can shine brightly enough to start healing the painful memories of their shared past. Growing global interest in the use of health as a bridge to peace poses an exciting challenge which WHO is uniquely placed to meet.

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Gutlove, Paula (June 2000). Application of the Peace through Health Approach in the North Caucasus: Report of an Inter-Agency Consultation, Moscow, 4-5 April 2000. Copenhagen, Denmark: World Health Organization, Regional Office for Europe. (23 pages).

This report describes an informal, inter-agency “Peace through Health” consultation convened by WHO and IRSS on 4-5 April 2000. Hosted by the Russian Red Cross in Moscow, the consultation brought together representatives of a variety of organizations concerned with health-related humanitarian assistance in the North Caucasus. Participants explored how humanitarian assistance programs can provide health benefits to target populations while also facilitating and promoting peace building, social reconstruction and, in the longer term, the development of democratic, stable society. At the organizational level, the consultation was intended to help the relevant agencies to coordinate their activities and utilize the Peace through Health (PTH) approach in the North Caucasus. This approach utilizes a shared concern for public health as an opportunity to deliver health care while engaging in social reconstruction and community reconciliation programs.

This report includes an overview of related PTH initiatives by WHO and IRSS in the Balkans, relevant initiatives shared by the consultation participants, and twelve basic “PTH Principles for Action” that could usefully be applied to health-related humanitarian assistance in the North Caucasus. Participants agreed that an Inter-agency Task Force should be formed to follow up this consultation. The report includes a description of the primary functions of the proposed Task Force.

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Gutlove, Paula (May 2000). Health as a Bridge to Peace: Briefing Manual. Cambridge, MA: Institute for Resource and Security Studies. (42 pages).

This manual was developed for the Medical Network for Social Reconstruction in former Yugoslavia. It provides background and support materials for understanding and developing a “health bridge for peace” (also called a “peace through health”) strategic approach. It contains information about the theory and practice of using health care delivery as a bridge for peace. In addition, it contains practical tools for building a health bridge project. These tools would best be used with a trained facilitator.

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Gutlove, Paula (March 2000). Health as a Bridge to Peace: Briefing Manual. Copenhagen, Denmark: World Health Organization, Regional Office for Europe. (41 pages).

This manual was developed for international agencies providing humanitarian assistance in the North Caucasus. It provides background and support materials for understanding and developing a “health bridge for peace” (also called a “peace through health”) strategic approach. It contains information about the theory and practice of using health care delivery as a bridge for peace. In addition, it contains practical tools for building a health bridge project. These tools would best be used with a trained facilitator.

Gutlove, Paula (December 1999). The Medical Network: Training to Bridge Health and Peace: Report on a Meeting and Training Workshops, Toplice, Slovenia, 24-27 September 1999. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Institute for Resource and Security Studies. (10 pages).

This report describes a meeting and associated training workshops that were held in Toplice, Slovenia, in September 1999. The program was hosted by the Slovene Philanthropy in Ljubljana, Slovenia. The meeting and training workshops were organized by the Medical Network for Social Reconstruction in the former Yugoslavia, whose history and purpose are described in Section II. Section III provides an overview of the Toplice program, which served a dual purpose. First, the meeting was an organizational meeting of the Medical Network. Second, the training workshops were led by members of the Medical Network, and the workshop participants were also members of the Medical Network. All meeting participants participated as both trainers and/or participants in the training workshops. Section IV gives a summary of the training workshops. Section V provides an overview of the Network organizational meeting.

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Gutlove, Paula (December 1999). The Dialogue-Action Process: An Analysis of the Dialogue Process IRSS Has Used in Its Work with Groups in Former Yugoslavia and the Caucasus. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Institute for Resource and Security Studies. (32 pages).

This paper begins with a description of the dialogue-action process as defined and used by IRSS. Examples from IRSS field experience in the former Yugoslavia and in the Caucasus are sprinkled liberally throughout the text in an effort to bring to life the situations in which the dialogue-action process has been used and the results it has wrought. In particular, we explore what dialogue experience of this type can teach us about how human beings heal, individually and as a social unit, from traumatic events, and how the human need for relationship is manifest in the dialogue process. Furthermore, the paper provides an opportunity to discuss the social utility of dialogue-action and how it can be sustained through the deliberate integration of facilitated dialogue with essential social functions.

This paper was written at the request of Harold Saunders, director of International Affairs at the Kettering Foundation and author of A Public Peace Process: Sustained Dialogue to Transform Racial and Ethical Conflicts. This seminal book analyzes and describes the use of sustained dialogue to transform conflictual relationships. In response to Saunder’s request that we respond to his book, this paper explores the field experience of IRSS with dialogue processes.

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Gutlove, Paula and foreword by Joseph V. Montville (November1999). Public Participation and Democracy Building in Slovakia. Washington, DC: Center for Strategic and International Studies.

This is a report on a program managed by Paula Gutlove through the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, DC. The Program on Public Participation and Democracy Building in Slovakia was designed as a catalyst for citizen leaders to mobilize their talent, intelligence, and experience to build a sense of shared community and an empowered civil society. It was executed over the period December 1995 through September 1999 in three Slovak cities: Banska Stiavnica; Lucenec; and Dunajska Streda. These three cities reflect a range of ethnic, political, geographic and socioeconomic characteristics. In each city, a Leadership Council was selected and granted a generous budget to spend on projects for their community. At the end of the program period, members of the Leadership Councils of the three sites were brought together to exchange experiences and build cooperative projects. This program has created a unique bridge, linking diverse areas and communities in Slovakia, on which to build future civic activities.

Gutlove, Paula (1999). “Health Bridges for Peace: Integrating Health Care with Conflict Prevention and Community Reconciliation.” Peaceworks: Training to Promote Conflict Management, Volume 29. Washington, DC: United States Institute of Peace. (6 pages)

This article focuses on the Health Bridges for Peace project launched by IRSS in 1996. The project uses a shared concern, namely the restoration of public health, as a vehicle to convene, engage, and train health care professionals in conflict management and community reconciliation techniques. Also, after training the professionals, the project helps them design and implement intercommunal activities that integrate community reconciliation and conflict prevention strategies into health care delivery. The project’s first field program has taken the form of the Medical Network for Social Reconstruction, which connects all parts of the former Yugoslavia.

The article also describes the Health Bridges strategy, which deliberately integrates conflict management with other humanitarian efforts in an “integrated action” program. Through integrated action, conflicting parties are brought together to work on a humanitarian or development program that involves superordinate goals, and are provided with significant, concrete incentives for cooperation. At the same time, the humanitarian program receives the benefit of conflict management training expertise. Essential principles for integrating health initiatives with community reconciliation in a systematic and sustainable manner, as has been done in the former Yugoslavia, are also included in the article.

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Gutlove, Paula (1999). Conflict, Conflict Management, and Trauma Recovery: Briefing Manual for Workshop Participants. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Institute for Resource and Security Studies. (46 pages).

This manual was prepared for training workshops organized by the Medical Network for Social Reconstruction in the Former Yugoslavia in Ohrid, Macedonia, 27-30 May 1999, as a part of a larger trauma recovery training program. The manual covers basic concepts of conflict management processes, trauma recovery, conflict transformation, expanding the concept of healing, and community reconstruction and reconciliation, including articles by Vamik D. Volkan, Barrett Hart, and Paula Gutlove. The manual also addresses dialogue, active listening, problem solving, and consensus building skills.

Gutlove, Paula (September 1999). The Medical Network as a Bridge to Health and Peace: Report on an International Seminar and Training Workshops, 27-30 May 1999, Ohrid, Macedonia. Graz, Austria: OMEGA Health Care Center and Cambridge, Massachusetts: Institute for Resource and Security Studies. (23 pages).

This report describes an international seminar and associated training workshops held in Ohrid, Macedonia, in May 1999. These events were organized by the Medical Network for Social Reconstruction in the Former Yugoslavia, whose history and purpose are described in Section II. Section III provides an interview of the Ohrid program, which served a dual purpose. First, the international seminar was the annual meeting of the Medical Network. Second, training workshops were staffed by members of the Medical Network. Workshop participants were health care professionals from Macedonia and Kosovo. Section IV gives a summary of the training workshops. Section V gives a summary of the international seminar. This report has four appendices. Appendices A through C are included in the report. Appendix D is a briefing manual for workshop participants, by Paula Gutlove, entitled “Conflict, Conflict Management, and Trauma Recovery.” It is available as a separate document.

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