Thompson, Gordon (September 2001). Medical Network for Social Reconstruction in the Former Yugoslavia: A Survey of Participants’ Views on the Network’s Goals and Achievements. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Institute for Resource and Security Studies. (13 pages, 3 appendices).

This report surveys the views of selected participants in the activities of the Medical Network for Social Reconstruction in the Former Yugoslavia, regarding the Network’s goals and achievements in the past (especially 1997-2001) and its goals for the future (especially 2001-2003). Participants’ views were obtained through interviews conducted during an international conference held by the Network at Neum, Bosnia, during the period 15-18 June 2001, on the theme “Children and Youth in Post-War Situations”.   The information provided by this survey can help to guide the future development of the Network.   Specifically, it will help participants to learn from the experience of the Network, and to incorporate that learning into the planning of future Network activities.   The Major conclusions find a is strong consensus about many of the Network’s goals, but there are also differences of opinion that should be discussed.   In addition, the Network’s future structure is a high-priority issue for discussion and it would benefit from the routine use of structured learning.

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Gutlove, Paula (September 2001). Children and Youth in Post-War Situations: Report on an International Conference and Training Workshops, Neum, Bosnia, 15-18 June 2001. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Institute for Resource and Security Studies. (12 pages, 6 appendices).

This report gives an overview and highlights of a conference of the Medical Network for Social Reconstruction in the Former Yugoslavia (the Network). The report begins with a description of the Network, a community of health-care professionals from all parts of the former Yugoslavia working toward the reconciliation of existing conflicts and the prevention of further conflicts in the region through rebuilding structures for public health care and creating bridges for community reconstruction. A summary and evaluation of the conference follows. Appendices include: lists of participants in the conference and the contact group meeting; the conference program itinerary; the introduction to keynote speaker Svetlana Broz’s book Good People in a Time of Evil; an exercise in project development and proposal writing used in one of the training workshops; and responses to the conference evaluation form.

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Gutlove, Paula (September 2000). The Medical Network as a Bridge to Health and Peace: Report on an International Conference and Training Workshops 4-7 May 2000, Gracanica, Bosnia. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Institute for Resource and Security Studies. (7 pages).

This report describes an international conference and associated training workshops held in Gracanica, Bosnia, in May 2000. The seminar and training workshops were organized by the Medical Network for Social Reconstruction in the Former Yugoslavia, whose history and purpose are described in Section II. Section III provides an overview of the Gracanica conference. The conference had four distinct but interrelated activities, which are described in Section IV. These four activities were: demonstration of existing grass roots programs; professional training; Medical Network program planning and organizational development; and international promotion of concepts of social reconstruction. Section V discusses the impact of the meeting, and Section VI provides some broad conclusions.

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Gutlove, Paula (June 2000). “Health as a Bridge to Peace: The Role of Health Professionals in Conflict Management and Community Reconciliation.” Violence and Health: Proceedings of the WHO Global Symposium, 12-15 October 1999 Kobe, Japan: Kobe World Health Organization. Reprinted with Permission (12 pages).

Involvement of professionals from different sides of a conflict in the delivery of health care can be a model for collaborative action, and can create the long-term community involvement that is essential for sustainable peace. This paper looks at the Health Bridges for Peace project (HBP), an initiative launched by the Institute for Resource and Security Studies (IRSS) in 1996 to help health care professionals realize their potential to heal violence-ravaged individuals and communities. The project utilizes a shared concern, namely the restoration of public health, as a vehicle to convene, engage, and train health care professionals in conflict management and community reconciliation techniques. IRSS initiated the first HBP field program in the former Yugoslavia in 1997 and the second HBP field program in the North Caucasus in November 1998. Both field programs have enjoyed the support of WHO and other international agencies.

HBP has provided new hope and possibilities to many indigenous health professionals, providing them with new opportunities, a new vision, and a new role in their community and in the world. By working and training together, health professionals are giving their communities a symbol of hope and a reason to believe that the promise of their shared future can shine brightly enough to start healing the painful memories of their shared past. Growing global interest in the use of health as a bridge to peace poses an exciting challenge which WHO is uniquely placed to meet.

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Gutlove, Paula (June 2000). Application of the Peace through Health Approach in the North Caucasus: Report of an Inter-Agency Consultation, Moscow, 4-5 April 2000. Copenhagen, Denmark: World Health Organization, Regional Office for Europe. (23 pages).

This report describes an informal, inter-agency “Peace through Health” consultation convened by WHO and IRSS on 4-5 April 2000. Hosted by the Russian Red Cross in Moscow, the consultation brought together representatives of a variety of organizations concerned with health-related humanitarian assistance in the North Caucasus. Participants explored how humanitarian assistance programs can provide health benefits to target populations while also facilitating and promoting peace building, social reconstruction and, in the longer term, the development of democratic, stable society. At the organizational level, the consultation was intended to help the relevant agencies to coordinate their activities and utilize the Peace through Health (PTH) approach in the North Caucasus. This approach utilizes a shared concern for public health as an opportunity to deliver health care while engaging in social reconstruction and community reconciliation programs.

This report includes an overview of related PTH initiatives by WHO and IRSS in the Balkans, relevant initiatives shared by the consultation participants, and twelve basic “PTH Principles for Action” that could usefully be applied to health-related humanitarian assistance in the North Caucasus. Participants agreed that an Inter-agency Task Force should be formed to follow up this consultation. The report includes a description of the primary functions of the proposed Task Force.

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Gutlove, Paula (May 2000). Health as a Bridge to Peace: Briefing Manual. Cambridge, MA: Institute for Resource and Security Studies. (42 pages).

This manual was developed for the Medical Network for Social Reconstruction in former Yugoslavia. It provides background and support materials for understanding and developing a “health bridge for peace” (also called a “peace through health”) strategic approach. It contains information about the theory and practice of using health care delivery as a bridge for peace. In addition, it contains practical tools for building a health bridge project. These tools would best be used with a trained facilitator.

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Gutlove, Paula (March 2000). Health as a Bridge to Peace: Briefing Manual. Copenhagen, Denmark: World Health Organization, Regional Office for Europe. (41 pages).

This manual was developed for international agencies providing humanitarian assistance in the North Caucasus. It provides background and support materials for understanding and developing a “health bridge for peace” (also called a “peace through health”) strategic approach. It contains information about the theory and practice of using health care delivery as a bridge for peace. In addition, it contains practical tools for building a health bridge project. These tools would best be used with a trained facilitator.